1.

 

‘ A towel falls, a body emerges from steam and drips over the impermeable floor...the glass smashes, limbs freeze and the fluid runs thick.

 

I guess, when I am aiming to make sculpture that depends on sculpture installations, that depends on the insinuation of the possibly of the narrative within the spaces which frequently have strong visual and culture reference, like locker rooms and swimming pools, which both have a very strong visual history in cinema and our own personal understands of our bodies I guess when we group up. My aim is particularly towards ideas / to discusses ideas of masculinity with those spaces and uncomfortability of the relationship between masculinity and desire.

So, that is really the spine and the backbone of a lot of my work. That, that sort of; the feeling of the complex nature of masculinity and desire.

 

And, relation to creating installations, there is a sort of need, I am beginning to treat it and coming to the realisation that it is fantasy fiction and the superheroic narrative is becoming a part of the way I think about my work and that is what I am transitioning into, a step into the more surreal, the more unreal, the more fantastical and in the same way that you create fictional worlds for comic books for superheroes for films, its world building and in order to do that you have to have those details. And, details in more work, in representation of spaces you have to have, which is a fiction in itself - sculpture I treat it as a fiction, as much as sculpture is 3 dimensional, I feel that you have to treat it as unreal - and so they objects, the grounding objects, which are so everyday, the resin razor or the concrete dumbbells or the resin bow and arrows (a not so much everyday object) but they are handheld  tangible objects which are not what you expect them to be. They defy their function - like one of my favourite works of that which is using silicon to create a towels - which is quite a horrible balance between the texture of what you want a towel to be and its complete lack of utility . And, I think blue in relation to all of these things - has been important, it has felt really important for a really long time. There is a history of blue, a history of blue in sexuality and fine art but that is not really want what I am interested to do but I can’t really avoid it, I can’t really avoid talking about it. It is one of those things  when you are studying art and you are told to look at Derek Jarman's blue or maybe you should look at David Hockey’s blue because that is really amazing richness but the reality is blue for me is - its most important colour to me, it is rich and smooth and it is seductive in a way that I don’t find any other colours - and again it comes back to my work that covers seduction, these image of the ideal beautiful thing. I treat it with objects as i do ideals body and that is very much part of my research into masculinity - I only stretch so far in terms of what i do; It is mainly focused around men and male desire and toward men and that confusion. It is a funny thing that you often have when you talk to straight men, or gay men even, the confusion between wanting to be the ideal and wanting to have it in any possible way and that is a tension i like to create with these object. Because, I want them, i want to touch them but they aren’t real. I am trying to get that surface quality, that smoothness, that sheen plastic quality (plastic isn't necessarily a good example but it is the smoothness) -it is the desire for smoothness, the desire for bodies. They are all handheld objects, they are supposed to convey the body through their scale and your ability to imagine feeling that object and the real one, like the razor, how does the substitute feel. How does the substitute of a silicon towel versus a real towel  and a substitute towel to a real one. I often encourage people to touch my work but that is not often the case in a lot of gallery situations. It’s smooth and hard and intangible the ideal and desire failed me on the surface of a mirror, the cotton slips over the head once again …..



 

2.

 

‘ A towel falls, a body emerges from steam and drips over the impermeable floor...the glass smashes, limbs freeze and the fluid runs thick.

I believe that when you make sculpture and when you make sculptural installations you are creating a fiction. I feel like you have to accept you are entering a world of an unreal. In order to create a fiction / a new world in terms of narrative anyway, the things that hold together for a reader for someone coming into it, is details, relatable details and my details are supposed to be that inviting seductive thing an object that is smooth and holdable and seductive. The relationship between desire and masculinity and my objects meet in the iconography of what I choose to present I guess, the razor - the gillette razor - dumbbells, the bow and arrow, I guess in a more fantastical way but the fantasy is where I am headed, the narrative of super-heroism and masculinity and how, what those narrative mean now especially in a world of constant superhero movies that we live in now and changes in a slow but constant shift in the way that men view their own bodies and the ideal bodies and that confusion of desire and admiration and wanting to have the ideal. And, I think weirdly these objects that I, the details of my world building, will find small narratives of spaces of swimming pools, locker rooms, clubs. Those small blue objects are sort of the focus icons of the narrative really - because of their smoothness, their promise - of being able to hold them and at the same time being completely unreal becoming completely converse to their utility. They are just seductive blue objects and blue is to me the deepest, smoothest seductive colour. And smooth and hard and intangible, the ideal and desire failed to meet on the surface of a mirror, the cotton slips over the head once again…’

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Image:  Caption:  Higher Windows, Close up of installation, Alexander Glass, 2017, Exhibited at The Royal College of Art Degree Show 2017, photos courtesy of Corey Bartle-Sanderson

Image:

Caption:  Higher Windows, Close up of installation, Alexander Glass, 2017, Exhibited at The Royal College of Art Degree Show 2017, photos courtesy of Corey Bartle-Sanderson

Alexander Glass

@glassalexander